5th Grade Métis

NOVEMBER

Words/Topics Review:

Human Body Parts — Students learned new words for body parts (stomach, brain, toes, neck, bone, tongue, skull), and also reviewed already known names for body parts (hand, foot, face, eyes, ears, heart, shoulder, knee, leg, finger, mouth, teeth, hair, and head).

Hollywood — Students learned and reviewed vocabulary related to movies and television, such as: actor, actress, director, blockbuster, independent film, budget (high or low), the leading role, main character, plot twist, genre, star, “lights, camera, action,” setting, screen writer, thriller, horror, comedy, action, romantic comedy, crime, and drama.

Seasons & Weather — The students learned and reviewed vocabulary related to the seasons, weather, and vacation, such as: winter, summer, fall/autumn, spring, rain(y), wind(y), snow(y), cold, freeze, ice, cloud(y), leaf, leaves, snowman, leaf pile, vacation, beach, ski, sandcastle, and sun(ny). We also reviewed vocabulary related to extreme weather, such as: storm, volcano, tornado, earthquake, lightning, thstounder, and blizzard. We also explored how animals live in the their different environments, based on the seasons and weather. 


Thanksgiving — Students learned and reviewed a variety of words and ideas related to the American holiday of Thanksgiving, including: turkey, stuffing, feather, gobble, pie, Native American, mashed potato, pumpkin, pilgrim, Mayflower, cornucopia, grateful, harvest, and thankful.

 


Games & Activities - While the activities focus on specific vocabulary and topics, the students spend a lot of time speaking generally about topics, so they get to use a lot of “outside” vocabulary to add to the conversation. For example, when students speak about animals, they might also include language about food, weather, body parts, and color.

What Are You Thankful For? — Students practiced new phrases and conceptualizing “being thankful” by writing down people or things they are thankful for, and then the class had to guess what people were thankful for. Students were able to practice asking and responding to: “What are you thankful for?”

 

Taboo — Students practice new vocabulary by having to ONLY describe the new word/phrase to a partner with the goal of having the partner correctl guess the phrase. 


Secret Code — The students are very competitive with this game, and they have a lot of fun. The teacher makes a secret code for the alphabet . . . for example, c = b . . . which means that every letter = the letter before (gjti = fish, bojnbm = animal, hsboegbuifs = grandfather). Then, the teacher splits the class into groups or teams, and gives the teams a list of words or phrases related to a theme. The teams race to decipher the secret code as quickly as possible.

Crossword — We use this activity to practice the alphabet, spelling, proper pronunciation, and letter combinations. Often, at the beginning of each lesson, the teacher creates a crossword using words related to the theme for the day (colors, animals, halloween, etc). Using clues, the students must figure out each word, and spell the word correctly. This is a good activity to introduce new vocabulary or practice specific letter combinations, like “ch” or “th” or “sh” or “tch”. 

Where do you Live? — Students spend time thinking about their neighborhoods. The teacher demonstrates the activity to the class, which includes asking questions about where the students live. Then, the students move around the class and ask each other questions about their neighborhoods, which the students must answer using the vocabulary we practiced.


Lights, Camera, Action — Students are split into pairs. The teacher demonstrates the activity by pitching a movie idea, including all the information about budget, leading actors/actresses, the plot, plot twist, setting, genre, and how the movie ends. Student pairs try to come up with the best movie ideas for a given genre (action, drama, comedy, thriller), using all of the reviewed vocabulary. These ideas are presented to the class.

October

Words/Topics Review:

Human Body Parts — Students learned new words for body parts (stomach, brain, toes, neck, bone, tongue, skull), and also reviewed already known names for body parts (hand, foot, face, eyes, ears, heart, shoulder, knee, leg, finger, mouth, teeth, hair, and head).

Animals — Students learned and reviewed the names of common animals we find at home, in our yard, in the forest, in the ocean, or at the zoo. This includes animals such as: dog, cat, bird, elephant, crocodile, fish, goldfish, hamster, mouse, wolf, turtle, monkey, eagle, shark, cow, goat, whale, chicken, pig, snake, lizard, squirrel, owl, turkey, fox, (brown, black, or polar) bear, bat, rabbit, and dolphin. We also reviewed vocabulary about how animals are different, such as: mammal, reptile, amphibian, fish, bird, scale, skin, gills, nest, live birth, poisonous, swamp, desert, prairie, and saltwater. Lastly, students learned new words about classification of animals, such as: herbivore, carnivore, and omnivore.

Seasons & Weather — The students learned and reviewed vocabulary related to the seasons, weather, and vacation, such as: winter, summer, fall/autumn, spring, rain(y), wind(y), snow(y), cold, freeze, ice, cloud(y), leaf, leaves, snowman, leaf pile, vacation, beach, ski, sandcastle, and sun(ny). We also reviewed vocabulary related to extreme weather, such as: storm, volcano, tornado, earthquake, lightning, thunder, and blizzard.

Community — Students learned and reviewed vocabulary that helped answer the question: Where do you live? We discussed the following: neighborhood, street, avenue, community, corner, area, region, address, local, law, and government.

Halloween — Students learned and reviewed a variety of words and ideas related to the holiday of Halloween, including: pumpkin, jack-o’-lantern, spooky, scary, monster (werewolf, zombie, mummy, ghost, witch/wizard, and Frankenstein), haunted house, Trick or Treat, costume, mask, spider web, “Boo!”, candy, and skeleton.


Games & Activities - While the activities focus on specific vocabulary and topics, the students spend a lot of time speaking generally about topics, so they get to use a lot of “outside” vocabulary to add to the conversation. For example, when students speak about animals, they might also include language about food, weather, body parts, and color.

Everyone Has Secrets! — This activity really encourages conversation and the students get to learn about each other (and the teacher!). On slips of paper, the students write three things about themselves that no one else knows, and the teacher does as well. The students then pick three slips of paper out of the hat (making sure not to pick their own), and students take turns reading the secrets, and guessing who they belong to. This activity improves reading comprehension, writing skills, and creativity.

Wag Your Tail — This is a fun, and very “energetic” activity that we use to learn and memorize information about animals. The class stands in a circle. The teacher chooses an animal and the students must move in a way that resembles the animal. For example, if the teacher says “wolf,” the students might start howling. If the teacher says “elephant,” the students might pretend to have a long trunk. In an adaptation of the activity, students might choose their own animal, which they act out, and the class guesses what it is. Or, the students might go in a circle and memorize the animals/actions of the student(s) before.

Secret Code — The students are very competitive with this game, and they have a lot of fun. The teacher makes a secret code for the alphabet . . . for example, c = b . . . which means that every letter = the letter before (gjti = fish, bojnbm = animal, hsboegbuifs = grandfather). Then, the teacher splits the class into groups or teams, and gives the teams a list of words or phrases related to a theme. The teams race to decipher the secret code as quickly as possible.

Family Tree — Students drew their family in their class notebook, and then labelled members of their family using the appropriate vocabulary. Then, students spoke with their peers about their brothers, sisters, mother, father, grandparents, etc. We used the phrase, “In my family tree, I have . . .”

Crossword — We use this activity to practice the alphabet, spelling, proper pronunciation, and letter combinations. Often, at the beginning of each lesson, the teacher creates a crossword using words related to the theme for the day (colors, animals, halloween, etc). Using clues, the students must figure out each word, and spell the word correctly. This is a good activity to introduce new vocabulary or practice specific letter combinations, like “ch” or “th” or “sh” or “tch”. 

Where do you Live? — Students spend time thinking about their neighborhoods. The teacher demonstrates the activity to the class, which includes asking questions about where the students live. Then, the students move around the class and ask each other questions about their neighborhoods, which the students must answer using the vocabulary we practiced.

Let’s Take a Trip to the Zoo — We use this activity to learn, review and memorize different types of animals and where they live. We also practice short questions and declarative phrases with this activity. Each student chooses to be a different animal in the zoo. He or she must know simple information about what the animal eats and how it lives. The teacher says, “Let’s take a trip to the zoo!” The students move around the room and ask/answer questions about their animals. One student might ask, “Do you fly?” or “What do you eat?”, and another student might respond, “I eat plants.” or “I do not fly.” The students also use the complex vocabulary about differences between animals, like whether animals use gills, or are omnivores.

A Day in the Life — Students randomly choose as animal and must pretend they will spend an entire day as that animal. They spend some time creating the perfect, thinking about what they eat, what they do, where they go, and what other animals they might hang out with. Then, the students present their “Day in the Life” to the class. To make it more difficult, the teach can assign animals, or the students listening to the presentation need to guess the animal.

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aktualizováno: 13.12.2018 02:23:48